10 Snowmobile Tool Kit Must-Haves

SnowmobilingAt AMSOIL, we’re into snowmobiles. When living in an area that gets below-zero highs, you can feel a little antsy being stuck inside. In fact, we just broke our cold spell and got fresh powder over the weekend. This has amped up a few of our staff for sledding time. Snowmobiling is a therapeutic activity for northerners. Getting out and enjoying the outdoors year-round is good for the soul.

For the most revitalizing experience, proper planning can save you from headaches.

Here are 10 snowmobile kit must-haves for your next ride:

  1. Spare spark plugs and plug tool – If you’re not using AMSOIL synthetic two-stroke snowmobile oil, plug fouling can be a problem. Having a spare saves you from getting sidelined. Many sleds come with a handy tool to help you get the job done.
  2. Spare belt – Broken belts are an issue for a lot of powersports equipment, including snowmobiles. It is always a best practice to carry a spare.
  3. Tool kit – Back in the day, most snowmobiles came with a handy tool kit. Today, however, most sleds come with just a spark-plug tool and maybe a clutch tool to help replace the belt. Build your own tool kit and include a screwdriver, small wrench set and pliers.
  4. Zip ties – These come in handy if you need a quick fix.
  5. Bailing wire or duct tape – If something big breaks, like a control arm or plastic shroud, these can help bind your machine together if you need to limp back home.
  6. Pull-cord rope – You never want to yank the starter cord and have it come out in pieces. An emergency rope can get you going again. Some modern electric-start sleds don’t come standard with a pull cord. If the battery fails, you can wrap your emergency pull-cord rope around the primary clutch to start the engine.
  7. Tow rope – Getting stuck is a bummer. Have a tow rope to pull you out and avoid any frustration. In some situations, the sled-pull method also works great, as shown here.

  8. Spare fuel hose – Extra fuel hose can be used to fix a cracked fuel line. Plus, it doubles as a siphon if someone in your crew runs out of fuel. Some sleds have fuel caddies on the back for carrying extra fuel, too. If you have a two-stroke sled, extra oil is also essential.
  9. First-aid kit – Accidents happen when you least expect it, so it’s a good idea to carry gauze and bandages.
  10. Survival kit – If things turn for the worse and the cold rushes in, it’s important to have items to keep you protected, including a flashlight, fire-lighting tools, emergency blanket, hand warmers, high-energy snacks and water.

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